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the Herald 8

SIR PHILLIP SYDNEY Even in death it was deemed importance to mark your status in society for the sixteenth century nobility. It was normal for the funeral of a noble to be organized by a herald. This was a good opportunity for herald's to supplement their income and this often caused dispute among the heralds as to who's turn it was to officiate at a particular funeral. Sir Phillip Sydney was given a state funeral, a rare honor.To this day ceremonies such as funerals and coronations are arranged by heralds under the direction of the earl marshal. This process began in the sixteenth century. Paintings of processions usually show the herald leading, bearing the coats of arms of the deceased....

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The Herald 7

Visitations were one of the main ways that heralds recorded, granted and corrected coats of arms in the sixteenth century. Provincial kings were authorized to make visitations of counties in their provinces starting in the year 1530. In summertime they would travel to one county so it took many years for all of England and Wales to be covered. The counties in the south closer to London were visited much more frequently than the far flung counties to the north and the west.​The King of Arms or his deputy would set up shop i n a local tavern or nobles home for a number of weeks and every noble man in the district who laid claim to a coat of...

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The Herald 6

Some heralds liked to write about heraldry and genealogy and several of them belonged to the Society of Antiquaries. Their writing and collection of old manuscripts fitted in well with the work of the society and they frequently met in Garter's chambers at the College of Arms. Some of the heralds were published authors of note including William Segar whose noted work “ Booke of Honor and Armes “ was published in 1590 and John Hart, the Chester Herald, had 2 books published.During the Elizabethan age, there was an increased emphasis on genealogy in the heralds’ work as the gentry class rose in importance. Wealthy "new men" were eager to prove their gentility and be granted arms. Only persons of...

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The Herald 5

Following the death of an officer in the office of Heraldry his replacement typically came from the ranks of those below him. The Garter was the most senior in ranks of the Heralds, and when he died he would be replaced by one of the provincial kings. The provincial king that was chosen would be replaced in his position by one of the heralds and the herald in turn would be replaced by a pursuivant. The pursuivant was the lowest rung on the ladder and his replacement would be someone seeking an entry level position into the College of Heraldry. The College of Heraldry was under the leadership of the Earl Marshall and entry level officers were recommended to him...

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The Herald 4

The job of the Herald was to represent and advise his lord or master in all matters related to heraldry. Originally Herald's were messengers, trusted with conveying messages between nobles within the kingdom and sometimes further afield. When a jousting tournament was in the planning stages the noble lord planning the event would send his Herald to neighboring nobility with an invitation to the event. In times of war the herald would accompany his master into battle to help identify both his allies and his enemies on the battlefield. The Herald would also accompany his master to peace talks with the enemy.One of the most important rules of Heraldry is that each coat of arms is unique to the bearer...

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